safety tips

How to winterize your truck – tips for trucking fleets – Tech Tip Tuesday

November 24, 2016
Source: FleetOwner.com

Snow, ice and freezing temperatures not only make the roads hazardous for hauling freight during the winter months but can damage equipment and retard fuel economy, too. Here are some tips on how to minimize such winter weather risks. 

Everyone knows operating tractor-trailers during the winter comes with some big risks. But did you know that, on average 467 fatalities are associated with icy driving conditions annually, or that 23% of all vehicle crashes every year – some 1.3 million – are caused in part by inclement weather, such as rain, sleet, snow, fog, and wind? (Those weather-related findings are courtesy Federal Highway Administration research, by the way).

On top of that, cold weather can cause diesel fuel to thicken into “gel” or get waterlogged, potentially damaging a truck’s fuel system and engine. Colder temperatures also affect fuel economy, too, by increasing tire rolling resistance and reducing aerodynamic efficiency, to name just two impacts.

“As winter approaches, we want to equip fleets and their drivers with the best information available for increasing safety on America’s congested and frequently traveled roads,” noted Dean Croke, VP of analytics at Omnitracs, LLC. “With fewer daylight hours and compromised road conditions, seasonal weather creates many challenges for truck drivers.”

Croke breaks down his winter operation advice down into two groups, one focused on drivers and one on equipment. For drivers:

Slow down and be cautious in adverse weather such as rain, sleet, snow, fog and wind.
Always buckle up; safety belts reduce the risk of fatal injury by 45%, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
Keep extra water and non-perishable food in the cab; dehydration and malnourishment can cause weakness, dizziness, confusion, sluggishness, fainting and more, according to […]

By |November 29th, 2016|Bentley News & Events, Commercial Trucking Industry, Tech Tips|Comments Off on How to winterize your truck – tips for trucking fleets – Tech Tip Tuesday

Reduce Fatigue Related Accidents – Safety Tips

Safety Matters – Great Info from the NationaLease Newsletter

Practicing good safety can save lives and ultimately can save you money, and NationaLease wants to help keep safety at the forefront with some helpful safety tips. Today’s tip discusses preventing fatigue-related accidents. Research shows that driver fatigue may contribute to up to 20% of accidents on the road, here are some ways to help combat fatigue:

• Make sure you are fit to drive. Do not begin a journey if you are tired. Get a good
night’s sleep before embarking on a long journey.
• Avoid undertaking long journeys between midnight and 6am, when natural
alertness is at a minimum
• Plan your journey to take sufficient breaks. A minimum break of at least 15 minutes
after every two hours of driving is recommended
• If you feel sleepy, stop in a safe place. Do not stop on the hard
shoulder of a motorway
• The most effective ways to counter sleepiness are to drink, for example,
two cups of caffeinated coffee and to take a short nap (up to 15 minutes).
• For more information on preventing fatigue-related accidents, see this article from ntsb.gov

Safety Tips Fact Sheet

By |January 29th, 2016|Bentley News & Events, Safety & Compliance, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Reduce Fatigue Related Accidents – Safety Tips

Helpful information for fleet drivers during hailstorms – Tech Tip Tuesday

There are some measures that drivers can take, though, to protect themselves and their vehicle during hailstorms.
Here are some safety tips, provided by Union Mutual of Vermont and Progressive Insurance, you can pass along to fleet drivers as a friendly reminder.

When hail is larger than three-quarters of an inch in diameter, drivers are advised to:

Stop driving. If you can see a safe place to drive to, such as inside a garage or under a service station awning, do so as soon as you can. Make sure you pull completely off the highway, but avoid ditches due to possible high-rising water.
Keep your vehicle angled so the hail hits the front of the vehicle. Windshields are reinforced to withstand forward driving and pelting objects. Side windows and back glass are not, so they’re much more susceptible to breakage.
Stay away from vehicle windows. Cover yourself with a blanket or coat, if possible, because there may be debris. In particular, protect your eyes. See if you can get onto the floor face-down, or lay down on the seat with your back to the windows.
Don’t leave the vehicle until the hailing stops. Your car will furnish reasonable protection.

To learn more about the hailstorm research project, click here

From the Automtive News website

Visit our Tech Tips section here.

Contact us to share your preventative maintenance tips and tricks.

By |July 21st, 2015|Bentley News & Events, Commercial Trucking Industry, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Helpful information for fleet drivers during hailstorms – Tech Tip Tuesday

Driving During a Dust Storm – Tech Tip Tuesday

Important safety infomration for truckers about driving during dust storms

We found this helpful article and video on the www.automotive-fleet.com website

Dust storms, in an instant, can dramatically reduce visibility and create driving conditions that can lead to major chain collisions. The biggest mistake that drivers make is failing to pull completely off the road when they see a massive cloud of dust approaching.

Here’s some advice, provided by the Arizona Department of Transportation, to educate your fleet drivers on how to respond to this extremely dangerous weather event.

,

• Always avoid driving into or through a dust storm.
• If you encounter a dust storm, immediately check traffic around your vehicle (front, back and to the side) and begin slowing down.
• Do not wait until poor visibility makes it difficult to safely pull off the roadway — do it as soon as possible. Completely exit the highway if you can.
• Don’t stop in a travel lane or in the emergency lane. Look for a safe place to pull completely off the paved portion of the roadway.
• Turn off all vehicle lights, including your emergency flashers.
• Set your emergency brake and take your foot off the brake.
• Stay in the vehicle with your seat belts buckled and wait for the storm to pass.
• Drivers of high-profile vehicles should be especially aware of changing weather conditions and travel at reduced speeds.

www.automotive-fleet.com

By |August 26th, 2014|Commercial Trucking Industry, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Driving During a Dust Storm – Tech Tip Tuesday

Cruise Control Can Help – Tech Tip Tuesday

Here’s some helpful info about cruise control for your fleet drivers

FROM THE DESK OF THE SAFETY PROFESSIONAL ON FLEETRESPONSE.COM WEBSITE: CRUISE CONTROL

Cruise control can be beneficial when used under proper road, climate and traffic conditions. It enables you to maintain a safe speed without keeping your foot on the gas pedal thereby reducing driver fatigue during a long trip. While there are benefits it is important to know when it is appropriate to use the system.

In order to be a safer driver, only use cruise control when:

-The pavement is dry (no rain, sleet, ice or snow
-The road is straight and clear ahead (not under repair, no barricades or posted detours
-Traffic is light and all lanes are moving at reasonable speeds

It is not safe to use cruise control when:

-You cannot drive at a steady speed
-You are driving on winding roads or in heavy traffic
-The road is under repair or construction with obstacles or barricades on the roadway
-You do not have clear visibility of the road ahead
-There is heavy vehicle or pedestrian traffic or signal control lights at frequent intervals

By |August 12th, 2014|Bentley News & Events, Commercial Trucking Industry, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Cruise Control Can Help – Tech Tip Tuesday

Truckers use Cruise Control for safety and efficiency

Use your cruise control under proper conditions

We found some helpful info about cruise control for truckers on the Fleet Response website.

Cruise control can be beneficial when used under proper road, climate and traffic conditions. It enables you to maintain a safe speed without keeping your foot on the gas pedal thereby reducing driver fatigue during a long trip. While there are benefits it is important to know when it is appropriate to use the system.

In order to be a safer driver, only use cruise control when:

-The pavement is dry (no rain, sleet, ice or snow
-The road is straight and clear ahead (not under repair, no barricades or posted detours
-Traffic is light and all lanes are moving at reasonable speeds

It is not safe to use cruise control when:

-You cannot drive at a steady speed
-You are driving on winding roads or in heavy traffic
-The road is under repair or construction with obstacles or barricades on the roadway
-You do not have clear visibility of the road ahead
-There is heavy vehicle or pedestrian traffic or signal control lights at frequent intervals

By |February 27th, 2014|Bentley News & Events, Commercial Trucking Industry, Press Releases, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Truckers use Cruise Control for safety and efficiency

Severe Cold Weather Tips for your Truck

Keep your trucking running smoothly and safely through the winter season.
Save money with these severe cold weather precautionary measures.
By taking a few simple precautionary steps you can save lots of money and frustration during severe weather throughout the winter season.

-park vehicles indoors whenever possible
-plug in vehicles equipped with block heaters
-make sure fuel tanks are full and fuel caps are secured
-blended fuel or fuel additive
-drain all air tanks of moisture and then refill before resuming duty
-keep vehicles parked away from buildings to avoid falling roof snow
-do not park in a below grade (below ground level loading dock) to reduce flooding danger or getting stuck in ice
-keep the cab parked opposite the storms direction whenever possible
-close and secure all vehicle windows and doors
-use extreme cold windshield washer fluid
-keep an ice scraper and/or snow broom in the cab or in the cargo area for easy access

Let us know some of the steps you take to keep your truck running at peak performance during the winter season.

Share safety tips with other truckers and fleet owners!

By |February 10th, 2014|Bentley News & Events, Commercial Trucking Industry, Tech Tips|Comments Off on Severe Cold Weather Tips for your Truck

Is your truck equipped properly with an emergency kit for winter?

Winter storms have already swept across the US

Prepare your trucks, fleet and drivers with proper winter emergency kits

Here are a few items to check for. Be sure you have everything you might need and that all of your emergency kit contents are up-to-date and working properly.

CarMax performed an online survey and strangely enough, only 24 percent who were surveyed said they equipped their vehicle with a winter emergency kit. Even more baffling was that residents in the Northeastern United States were even more unprepared with a mere 35 percent reporting that they keep a winter emergency kit in their vehicles.

Winter emergency kit checklist

Cell phone car charge
First-aid kit
Flashlight
Jumper cables
Flares and/or hazard triangles
Ice scraper
Extra warm clothing, gloves and a blanket (preferably wool)Snow shovel
Cat litter — for traction on icy/slick roads
Food and bottled water
Extra windshield washer fluid
Snow shovel

What emergency items do you keep in your truck?

By |December 19th, 2013|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Is your truck equipped properly with an emergency kit for winter?

Safety Tips for Winter Driving

Helpful safety tips from truck drivers

Truck Drivers post helpful Winter Driving Safety Tips

We found this great article on the Work Truck Magazine website:

American Trucking Associations (ATA) wants to ensure the motoring public is prepared for winter storms taking place across the U.S. and that all motorists arrive to their destinations safely, in the coming months. Winter road conditions can lead to dangerous situations. Fortunately, a team of million mile accident-free drivers are helping to make our roads safer.

Winter Driving Safety Tips

America’s Road Team Captains, elite professional truck drivers are offering advice on how to safely navigate through winter road conditions. Tips include:

Map your route: Know where you are going and be prepared, ahead of time, to exit off the highway when needed. Indecisive driving is a major cause of traffic problems.
Avoid extreme weather conditions: Ice, hail, and snow make roads difficult to travel. Try to avoid driving through extreme weather conditions, and travel during daylight as much as possible.
Remove ice and snow from your vehicle: Clear your windows and roof of snow to ensure you have maximum visibility and avoid creating a hazard for the vehicle behind you. Don’t allow ice and snow to create additional blind spots on your vehicle.
Slow Down: With winter weather conditions present, speeding becomes increasingly hazardous. Allow plenty of a space cushion and reduce your speed.
Prepare an emergency kit: Contents should include: battery powered radio, flashlight, blanket, jumper cables, fire extinguisher, first aid kit, bottled water, non-perishable foods, maps, tire repair kit and flares.
Watch for black ice, a thin layer of transparent ice that forms when temperatures are close to freezing. Black ice may make the road look slightly wet and is difficult to spot. Watch for […]

By |December 19th, 2013|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Safety Tips for Winter Driving